Library

Cats + Behavior

  • Dexmedetomidine is a sedative/tranquilizer used primarily in cats and dogs as a pre-medication injection for anesthesia or for chemical restraint. It is also used orally in dogs for short-term anxiety management. The most common side effect is a low heart rate. Dexmedetomidine should not be used in patients with severe heart liver or kidney disease. It should be used cautiously in young, old, or weak animals. Consult your veterinary office immediately if you suspect a negative reaction or overdose.

  • Behavior Management - Pet Selection Guidelines

    Pueden evitarse muchos problemas de salud y de comportamiento en las mascotas pidiendo consejo antes de adquirirlas. Estos consejos ayudan, primero, a seleccionar la mejor mascota para una familia en particular, para lo cual hay que tener en cuenta la especie, la raza, la edad y el sexo del animal, y también el lugar en el que se va a adquirir.

  • The estrous cycle, better known as a female cat's heat cycle, consists of several stages; the stage called estrus refers to when the female is sexually receptive. This handout explains the age of onset, the clinical signs of a cat in heat, the length and phases of the heat cycle, as well as the benefits of spaying a female before her first heat cycle.

  • Losing weight is often a difficult process and animals, like people, often take weeks or months to shed those unwanted pounds. Feeding a prescription weight reduction diet is certainly a good start in a weight loss program for your cat, but it is important to remember that food intake is only one part of the problem.

  • You’ve probably heard lots of funny cat anecdotes; about how you don’t own them…they own YOU; how they feel superior to everyone, especially dogs; that they expect to be treated like royalty. If you are considering a feline acquisition, first consider this: lots of those remarks are true! This handout explains the other factors to consider in selecting the cat most likely to choose your family, too.

  • Fear is an aversive emotional state with physiological, behavioral, and emotional reactions to stimuli which are perceived as an actual threat or danger. Fears may be rational or irrational; they may be adaptive or maladaptive. Fear may result in aggressive responses by pets. A phobia is a sudden, profound, or excessive fear response. Anxiety may be defined as diffuse generalized feelings of apprehension, unease, and/or nervousness regarding an imminent event, uncertain outcome, or an anticipated threat or danger. Fear can be the result of an early experience that was unpleasant or perceived by the pet as unpleasant but it does not always take an unpleasant experience for fear to develop. Any stimuli that a dog or cat has not been exposed to during its sensitive period of development, which is up to 3 months of age in dogs and 2 months of age in cats, may become a fear-evoking stimulus. Illness, pain, or the effects of aging may lead to an increase in fear or anxiety in situations where there was previously little or no problem. A good program of socialization and exposure to many new and novel situations while a pet is young and in a thoughtful and proactive manner can be helpful in preventing fears and phobias. Professional intervention can help to prevent the behavior from worsening.

  • Cat food has been made so palatable that it can easily create gluttonous behavior. Meal feeding and portion control are important to prevent obesity. Owners should not give in to begging behavior. Cats that are still hungry after their meal can be supplemented with snacks such as green vegetables recommended by your veterinarian. Cats that eat too quickly can be fed creatively to slow down eating.

  • Cat Behavior Problems - Scratching Behavior

    Para los gatos arañar es un comportamiento normal que tiene al menos 4 funciones diferentes reconocidas: ir eliminando la parte externa de la uña, estirar y poner en forma los mecanismos necesarios para sacar y retraer las uñas, dejar marcas visuales para comunicarse con otros gatos y dejar unas señales químicas olorosas que proceden de unas glándulas de las almohadillas.

  • Head down. Eyes averted. Shoulders hunched. Tail thumping the floor. Body retreating. Your pet looks guilty, maybe even apologetic, right? WRONG! Your pet’s body posture and attitude do not indicate guilt or remorse but represent a response to your body posture and attitude.

  • Losing a pet is difficult for all members of the family including surviving pets. Dogs and cats view family members, animal and human, as part of a pack. The stability of the pack is important to the pet’s sense of well being. Disruption of the pack dynamic that occurs when one pet dies can impact the other pets in the family. Pets form relationships with each other and with humans and they respond to the loss of a family member with physical and behavioral changes that manifest as grief. Recognizing and dealing with pet grief can help re-establish a healthy family unit.